How to Avoid Transplant Shock in Monstera

If you’re sporting a large and big, Monstera Deliciciosa or the less delicate trails of Monstera Adansonii, the day comes when you’ll need to pot it again.

The tropical beauty grows beautifully indoors, and quickly surpassing the pots they were originally planted in for their nursery.

Repot only as needed to reduce stress on your Monstera most preferably in the summer. Be careful when handling to prevent damaging the roots. After transplanting, be aware of your water levels, and think about a root growth stimulator for the optimal results.

Repotting any plant can be stressful. Let’s look at ways to reduce stress and avoid shock from transplants.

What is Transplant Shock?

Transplant shock is a severe but short-lived condition that could be a problem for plants with monstera immediately following the repotting.

The roots of every plant like being taken away from the comfort of their natural habitat. In the process, they are not able to handle stress and are unable to accomplish their job.

No matter how sturdy they may appear, their delicate process of absorbing nutrients and water from the soil surrounding them can make them fragile.

If the roots are stressed, they cease to function properly. This means that it takes some time to heal and take in the nutrients and water that your Monstera needs to flourish.

As a result, transplant shock resembles dehydration. It is characterized by limp leaves that give your plant a loose and yellowing appearance. It also appears under-watered. However, it could also trigger slow growth and diseases.

Monstera leaves

How to Prevent Transplant Shock

Know When to Transplant

Monstera is an Aroid. These brave climbers are found in tiniest nooks and crevices in the rain forest floor and even in tree canopy areas out in nature. If there’s nothing else the climbers will take root in the sand of leaf litter.

Large, spacious pots aren’t required to house your outdoor Monstera. Instead, let your Monstera to grow roots before planting again.

The younger plants need to be potted only once every year to stimulate growth. However, larger plants can be kept for up to two or three years dependent on the dimensions that the container.

If you notice that your Monstera is affected by the negative consequences of excessive watering it, you might want to plant it again. The soil that is sloppy and fungal-infested should be replaced with a fresh well-draining, well-drained medium.

In case your Monstera suffers from excessive watering If your plant is suffering from overwatering, this step-by-step instruction can assist you in saving your plant.

Try Not to Disturb Roots

The roots of your Monstera are the main source of nutrition. While the leaves are the star of the show they provide the nutrients and water required by the leaves to allow the plant to feed itself.

Your Monstera is likely to struggle to obtain the nutrients it requires from the soil when root structures are damaged. However, this can lead to the spread of the spread of fungus and decay.

This is especially relevant if you’re using new pots to treat to treat a disease or over-watering.

Be careful not to be harsh with the roots. Carefully break up the root mass. If the medium for growth is depleted, you can put the root system into an area of water. This will prevent root systems from breaking due to the weight of their own.

When you loosen roots, take care not to lose control. If water is able to pass through the root mass it will work. Therefore, you might not have to even loosen the roots in any way.

Take As Many Roots As Possible

The roots of your Monstera are the main source of nutrition. While leaves take the spotlight they provide the nutrients and water required by the leaves to allow the plant to feed itself.

Your Monstera is likely to struggle to obtain the nutrients it requires from the soil when root structures are damaged. However, this can lead to the spread of infection and decay.

This is especially relevant if you’re using pots that are new as a treatment to treat a disease or over-watering.

Be careful not to be harsh with the roots. Carefully break up the root mass. If the medium for growth is exhausted, you can put the root system into an area of water. This will prevent root systems from breaking due to the weight of their own.

When you loosen roots, take care not to lose control. If water is able to pass through the root mass it will work. It may not be necessary to loosen the roots in any way.

Remove The Dead Parts of The Plant

Repotting can be a great chance to perform an examination of your Monstera. It isn’t a common practice to check our plants from the root to the tip often. Repotting them is also an ideal time to cut the old stems and leaves.

Utilize sterilized scissors or shears to cut off brown leaves and dry clean stems. I like to start from the bottom and then work my way upwards, particularly with the trailing Monstera such as the Monstera Dansonii.

The dying and dead leaves as well as damaged stems are visible when they are repositioned on trellises or poles, making them simple to spot and then remove.

If Roots Are Removed, Trim off Top Portion of the Plant

Although it’s perhaps not the best option removal of roots can be required. Re-potting, for instance, to treat rot is likely to cause root loss. The removal of rotten roots will stop the spread of infection, but it can also remove healthy roots too.

The process of cutting off any new growth on the top the Monstera will allow it time to recover. In the end, the plant will channel it’s energy into reestablishing its roots, rather than generating new leaves.

This is a great chance to keep some additional plants on hand since Monstera is a prolific grower from cuttings, so make the most of this!

A fresh cutting of damaged plants may do better when repotting than a plant that has damaged roots.

Cut a hole at the point of node on your Monstera beneath the leaf cluster. This is the place at the point where your Monstera produces leaves as well as aerial roots.

After you’ve put it in an area of water and given it plenty of light, you’ll be able to grow a new plant within a matter of minutes.

Do Not Transplant During Dormant Period

They thrive in tropical regions in areas where temperatures remain high. This is the time of the day when they’re most powerful. The ideal time to pot a rootbound Monstera is in the spring and the summer months.

Tropical plants hibernate during the cold winter season. In the process, their the growth slows and becomes less responsive to changes.

Hibernating plants do not wish to be moved as a person who is sleeping is not one who wants to be forcedly relocated.

If you keep the dormant rootbound Monstera in a pot that is tightly sealed for a couple of months, it will not suffer any. Keep it in place until the weather warms up in spring, and the chances of sustaining the shock of transplantation will be greatly decreased.

But, there are instances that we’re unable to complete the task. Sometimes, you have to immediately take action, such as replacing the pot with roots that are rotten. Make sure you make use of fresh soil and pot, or clean the pot you have previously used.

Make the most of the hottest time of the day to repot plants to combat root decay. In order to treat your plants it is important to avoid exposing the roots of your Monstera exposed to the cold of air.

Apply A Root Growth Promoter

You can aid your Monstera when it is re-potting by giving it the proper nutrition boost.

A root growth stimulant contains hormones that stimulate the growth of new roots, and also nutrients that aid your plant to adapt to the new surroundings. (Check for costs at Amazon right here)

However using excessive fertilizer could cause burning of the already damaged roots of your Monstera and increase the risk of suffering from transplant shock.

So, I suggest diluting the fertilizer by half that strength as per the instructions on the package.

Water Carefully Before and After Transplanting

Root-bound Monsteras greatly benefit by soaking thoroughly prior to the repotting. In general, soils that are wet are more manageable since roots are less brittle and are more likely to break when working in dry soil.

Make sure to saturate your new medium after you’ve transplanted your plants. This starts the process of release of the nutrients in your mix, and allows your newly planted Monstera to adapt to its new surroundings.

After you’ve soaked it well It is best to allow it to dry completely before watering it again. Soggy soils are not good for Aroids of all types However, Monstera is not a good choice in this kind of soil.

Roots that are just transplanted are especially vulnerable to fungal infections. Roots can be damaged when you have the best of hands. You can avoid fungal infestations through letting your mix air dry completely.

In many instances the signs of transplant shock are similar to those that occur from under-watering. The distinctive leaves of your Monstera start to lose their color when the roots are under stress.

Do not be enticed to soak your poor plant. This can lead to root rot, which is a problem for the best of plants.

Keep An Eye on Transplanted Monstera

Even even if you’ve taken every precaution, your recently transplanted Monstera will likely exhibit symptoms of stress. Wilting is the most obvious sign.

Additionally the roots of your Monstera are damaged which is the most reliable method to determine if it’s healthy.

It shouldn’t take long before you begin to notice improvement If you’ve been cautious. Within a week or two you’ll notice that your Monstera will be completely recuperated.

Tropical superstars recover quickly when given the right treatment. They should allow you to take pleasure in the splendor of the leaves again when they return to their previous splendor.

Stephanie

Stephanie

Went from a bad gardener to a half-decent one over 10+ years. Super happy to share my tips and tricks with you :)